Ex-lawyer turned relationship coach

Wolves In Sheep’s Clothing

Seinfeld is considered to be one of the greatest sitcoms ever made.

It’s often described as a series about nothing, but actually touches on controversial topics, such as masturbation and oral sex.

How does Seinfeld disguise itself as family entertainment while juggling explosive materials?

Because mister Seinfeld and its writers are very good with language. The show graciously moves through minefields by never mentioning the unspeakable by name.

I’ll let you figure out what the next conversation from Seinfeld is about:

“My mother caught me…”
– “Caught you? Doing what?”
“You know… *puts on a long face* I was alone.”
– “You mean..?!”
“Uh-huh.”

Another way Seinfeld gets around tripwires is by using euphemisms.

In an episode where the lead characters enter a competition to see who can go the longest without masturbating, they never speak of masturbation. To check who are still in the race, the contestants ask each other: “Are you still master of your domain?”

Just like that Seinfeld snuck highly volatile content into our living rooms for nine years. And we thanked him for it.

So if your stories are having trouble holding people’s attention, it might not be your story which is the problem—but the way you’re telling it.

By Jeroen Elsing
Ex-lawyer turned relationship coach